Think About The Good Things !

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Get deep into the habit of personal introspection.

Ben Franklin called this one of the most important strategies for personal effectiveness.

Spend ten minutes every night before you go to bed in self-examination.

Think about the good things you did during the day and the bad actions you may have taken which you must change in order to excel and grow.

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Successful people are simply more thoughtful than others.

Daily reflection will soon allow for the eradication of your negative qualities (ranging from procrastination to gossiping to insulting others) and will sharpen the mind.

After steady practice, a time will eventually arrive when the mistakes you makes are few indeed and your personal power will move to the highest level.

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Read Daily Books To Achieve Your Success !

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How to improve as a public speaker, how to improve your relations with others,
how to become fitter or develop a better memory – all aspects of personal development are dealt with in books.

Therefore, in order to achieve your maximum potential, you must read daily.

But, in this age of information, you must be ruthless in what you consume.

Focus on your goals and read only those materials that will be asset to you.

Do not attempt to read everything for you are busy and have other tasks at hand.

Choose what is important and filter out what is of no value.

Begin with a solid newspaper every morning for an excellent summary of the key events of the day.

Also ensure that your readings are broadly based.

For example, perhaps you may wish to read history, business, Eastern philosophy, health books etc.

Then go to the library and develop the habit of making regular visits.

Read the classics from Hemingway to Bram Stoker.

Read history, with all its lessons on life and read biology for a new perspective.

Look under the heading of ” Success” at the library and you will be amazed at the literature you will find:
inspirational stories of people who developed greatness in the face of adversity, strategies for improving yourself physically,
mentally and spiritually and texts to tap the unlimited power for success that certainly exists within us.

Drink deeply from such books.

Surround yourself with them and read them constantly whether on the bus each day or before you go to bed.

Let them inspire and motivate you.

How often should you change bed sheets or clear the fridge?

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Keep germs off these objects of daily use by following this guide

From your toilet to the contents of your make-up bag, you’ll be shocked by how often these should be given a once-over to avoid nasty germs wreaking havoc on our health. While there are hundreds of tips out there on how often you should be cleaning these everyday household objects, we’ve asked experts for their top tips on how regularly you should change your sheets, clear out fridge and even wash your bra. Here’s what they recommend:

The Toilet

Toilets come with dirty reputations – but the average loo seat only has around 50 bacteria per square inch, which is less than most chopping boards. Aim to clean around the toilet bowl every day, and give your bathroom a proper clean once a week.

Bed Sheets

It’s a good idea to wash them every one to two weeks. “We shed a million skin cells (accompanied by oil and sweat) each night, and this attracts dust miles.”

The Fridge

The average fridge has around 750 times the level of safe bacteria that it should have. Cover all uncooked food, and throw out anything past its expiry date. As for cleaning it, wipe down the inside of your fridge every three to six months, or your food could become contaminated with nasty salmonella bacteria.

Mattresses

Mattresses are great breeding grounds for dust mites and bacteria because they hold so many dead skin cells. No matter how good the quality of your mattress, you shouldn’t keep it for longer than nine years.

Kitchen clothes and Sponges

These cleaning tools hoard between one million and 10 million bacteria per square inch. The Hygiene Council says they should be cleaned frequently. Pop them in a 60 degree C wash weekly and replace them often.

Mobile Phones

Studies have shown that your phone carries 10 times more bacteria than a toilet seat. Regularly clean it with an antibacterial wet wipe to avoid picking up bugs.

Bras

We all know we should be changing our knickers every day, but what about our bras? As a general rule of thumb, it’s a good idea to wash your bras after three to four wears.

Make-up

Make-up has a shelf life, and it might be shorter than you think.

Foundation: Liquids and cream foundations only last between six and 12 months, because bacteria can grow more easily in the water and oils that these contain. Powders can last up to two years.

Lipstick: These should be okay to keep for up to two years. But occasionally, clean the top layer of lipstick with a wipe to remove any bacteria.

Mascara: You should chuck your mascara three months after opening it to prevent bacteria from causing eye irritations or infections.

Sponges: Replace these every month and wash them with cleanser routinely.

 

​Internal Motivation

Internal motivation comes from within, such as pride, a sense of achievement, responsibility and belief.

There was a young boy who used to come for regular practice but always played in the reserves and never made it to the soccer eleven. While he was practicing, his father used to sit at the far end, waiting for him. The matches had started and for four days, he didn’t show up for practice or the quarter or semifinals. All of a sudden he showed up for the finals, went to the coach and said, “Coach, you have always kept me in the reserves and never let me play in the finals. But today, please let me play.” The coach said, “Son, I’m sorry, I can’t let you. There are

better players than you and besides, it is the finals, the reputation of the school is at stake and I cannot take a chance.” The boy pleaded, “Coach, I promise I will not let you down. I beg of you, please let me play.” The coach had never seen the boy plead like this before. He said, “OK, son, go, play. But remember, I am going against my better judgment and the reputation of the school is at stake. Don’t let me down.”


The game started and the boy played like a house on fire. Every time he got the ball, he shot a goal. Needless to say, he was the best player and the star of the game. His team had a spectacular win.


When the game finished, the coach went up to him and said, “Son, how could I have been so wrong in my life. I have never seen you play like this before. What happened? How did you play so well?” The boy replied, “Coach, my father is watching me today.” The coach turned around and looked at the place where the boy’s father used to sit. There was no one there. He said, “Son, your father used to sit there when you came for practice, but I don’t see anyone there today.” The boy replied, “Coach, there is something I never told you. My father was blind. Just four days ago, he died. Today is the first day he is watching me from above.”

8 Ways To Beat A Headache Without Painkillers !

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You may suffer a ‘rebound’ headache when you take too many tablets.
Here are some natural ways to ease pain

One in 50 of us suffer ‘rebound headache’ because we pop too many painkillers over a long time.
Medical advice is to take painkillers no more than two days a week.
Here are ways to ease the pain without tablets.

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1) Take your thumb for a walk over your big too
In reflexology, your big toe relates to your head and applying pressure on it is said to help ease headache and migraines.
Denise Whichello Brown, author of the Reflexology Healing Bible, says: “Thumb-walk from the outer edge of the base of the
big toe up the outside, over the top and down the inside. Then thumb-walk up the back of the big toe from the base to the tip.”

2) Tennis balls advantage
Take two tennis balls and place them side by side in a sock so they’re in a ‘peanut shape’.
Now lie on your back and place the balls where your head meets your neck.
Slowly, tuck your chin down towards your chest as if nodding and repeat for one minute as the balls massage the neck.
Then, move your head from side to side as if saying no.
This helps soothe the suboccipital muscles that are a major cause of tension headaches.

3) Gulp down a glass of water
A headache may be a sign that your body needs more water.
Some experts say that when you’re mildly to moderately dehydrated, the blood vessels in the brain narrow
in an attempt to regulate body fluid levels, causing a headache.
So, if you think you haven’t drunk enough water during the day, glug a glass.

4) Eat something
Going too long without eating can trigger a headache.
Alexis Poole, registered nutritionist at Spoon Guru says:
“In your body, your brain requires the most energy to function.
If glucose levels drop too low, it’s one of the first areas affected, and a headache can be a symtom.”
You should aim to eat healthy, balanced meals at regular times, buit you’re out of routine, keep healthy snacks handy.
Try wholegrain oatcakes, a banana or natural yogurt with fruit.

5) Have a cup of cayenne
Capsaicin is the active ingredient in cayenne pepper and it’s been shown to bring pain relief to migraine sufferers.
It works by desensiting nerve endings.
“A quick and easy way to consume cayenne pepper? Mix one teaspoon with lemon juice in a cup of warm water and drink.”

6) Nod your head
Lots of headache are cause by tension in the neck muscles (often the results of sleeping awkwardly or
hunching at your desk all day). Gentle neck streches can ease muscles tightness and help ease the pain.
Try the Head Nod: “Drop your head down, tucking the chin in towards the upper chest.”
“Lift your head and look slightly up.
Continue to nod your head slowly and smoothly.”

7) Turn off your computer
Too much screen time can lead to ‘computer vision syndrome’ with symptoms including dry, burning eyes and headaches.
“Some people also have an underlying difficulty where the eyes have reduce stamina for focusing or working together.
Others may simply need glasses – so, see your optician.

8) Slip on your sunglasses
“Bright sunlight and glare from reflected sunlight can trigger migraines and headache in some people.”
“Opt for polarises sunglasses that have special filters which block glare.”

Life is an Echo !

Life is an Echo
A little boy got angry with his mother and shouted at her, “I hate you, I hate you.” Because of fear of reprimand, he ran out of the house. He went up to the valley and shouted, “I hate you, I hate you,” and back came the echo, “I hate you, I hate you.” This was the first time in his life he had heard an echo. He got scared, went to his mother for

protection and said there was a bad boy in the valley who shouted “I hate you, I hate you.” The mother understood and she asked her son to go back and shout, “I love you, I love you.” The little boy went and shouted, “I love you, I love you,” and back came the echo. That taught the little boy a lesson that our life is like an echo: We get back what we give​.

A Guide to Surviving Modern Life!

A Guide to Surviving Modern Life!

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Radical differences between the way we live now and the lives of our

ancestors are harming our health, but the following these rules will halt the damage

 

You would think that with the advances in modern medicine, an ambulance of food and healthier lifestyles, living in the 21st century would be pretty good for you. But it seems that radical difference between the way we live now and the lives of our ancestors are harming our health.

     At the America Association for the Advancement of science, researchers explained how the modern world is completely at odds with the way human senses, such as sight and taste, have evolved. They claim, for instance, that because our eyesight was designed to spot danger in the distance, staring close up at screens for hours will inevitably cause vision problems.

     Here’s our top-to-toe guide on how to survive modern life.

HEAD

THE PROBLEM: Depression and Anxiety

  If you think multitasking is a good way to get lots done, think again. According to neuroscientist Earl Miller, our brain aren’t wired for it. “People think they’re multitasking, but they’re actually just switching from one task to another very rapidly and performing each one less effectively,” he explains.

  Attempts to multitask have been found to increase production of the stress hormone cortisol and the fight-or-fight hormone adrenaline, leaving us anxious, and over time, increasing our risk of depression.

BEAT IT: Focus on one task at a time and take regular tech breaks. It’s especially important for good sleep that tablets and smartphones aren’t used before bed as they overstimulate the brain.

 

EYES

THE PROBLEM: Cyber-Induce sight loss

 Spending large amounts of time indoors under artificial lights and staring at computer screens has helped produce “myopia epidemic”, with as many as 90% of people needing glasses, according to experts. “We’re simply not spending as much time outside as when our vision system first evolved.”

 “a shift that is drastically affecting our sight.”

BEAT IT: Remember to blink regularly to encourage tear production, and adopt the 20-20-20

Rule: every 20 minutes, look 20 feet away for 20 seconds to give your eye muscles a break.

 

NOSE

THE PROBLEM: Smell depletion Our sense of smell is under attack from air pollution, according to an expert “Smell evolved in very odour-rich outdoor landscape.”  As a result of spending less time outdoors, the natural scents which were an important part of life for our ancestors – for example, telling them when food was safe to eat –  are now masked from us.

BEAT IT: It’s important to get outdoors more often, to go to green open spaces. Stop smoking as it Impairs both taste and smell.

 

EARS

THE PROBLEM: Hearing loss Technology has transformed the way we listen to music, from huge concept amplification to wireless headphones. But these advances have come at  a cost to our hearing, with overexposure to loud noise the single largest cause of preventable deafness.

BEAT IT: Don’t listen to music at more than 60% of your device’s maximum volume – some smartphones have a built – in safety monitors which warm you when you cross the line.

 

MOUTH

THE PROBLEM: Sugar addiction Paul Breslin, Professor of Nutritional Sciences at Rutgers University in the US, believes our love for sugary food comes from our ape ancestors who “would go up into the trees and gorge on the fruit in season”. However, today sugary treats are available all year round.

BEAT IT: Cut down gradually to lessen withdrawal symptoms; reduce sugar in tea and have fewer fizzy drinks. Stress can also have a major impact on sugar cravings, so try to manage yours. Eating foods rich in magnesium, such as nuts, seeds and even a little dark chocolate can help ease anxiety.

 

 LUNGS

THE PROBLEM: Struggling to breathe Air pollution is a big problem. In particular, levels of nitrogen dioxide – which is linked to heart and lung disease – is at dangerous levels.

BEAT IT: For adults and children with lung or heart problems, and for older people, the advice is to strenuous physical activity. People with asthma should use their inhalers more often.

 

STOMACH

THE PROBLEM: Depleted bacteria Eating processed foods, having super-clean homes and overusing antibiotics, have had an adverse impact on our body bacteria, reducing their numbers dramatically. Scientist now think this change could be linked to spikes in asthma, allergies and diabetes, which have all dramatically increase since the 1970s.

BEAT IT: “To replenish healthy gut bacteria, eating live yoghurt and fermented foods, such as Kimchi, Kefir and sauerkraut, can help.”

 

LEGS

THE PROBLEM: Sitting sickness Being chair-bound for hours cause poor posture, back strain, and weaker muscles and bones. It also slows blood circulation, triggering problems from swollen ankles and varicose veins to dangerous blood clots.

BEAT IT: Sit on something wobbly, such as an exercise ball or a backless stool, to force your core (stomach and lower back) muscles to work. Stand up every 30 minutes and walk around.